Reproductive System

Discussion in 'Books' started by josephvien, Apr 28, 2019.

  1. josephvien

    josephvien New Member

    What Is the Male Reproductive System?

    Most species have two sexes: male and female. Each sex has its own unique reproductive system. They are different in shape and structure, but both are specifically designed to produce, nourish, and transport either the egg or sperm.

    Unlike the female, whose sex organs are located entirely within the pelvis, the male has reproductive organs, or genitals, that are both inside and outside the pelvis. The male genitals include:

    [​IMG] the testicles

    [​IMG] the duct system, which is made up of the epididymis and the vas deferens

    [​IMG] the accessory glands, which include the seminal vesicles and prostate gland

    [​IMG] the penis

    In a guy who's reached sexual maturity, the two testicles (pronounced: TESS-tih-kulz), or testes (pronounced: TESS-teez), produce and store millions of tiny sperm cells. The testicles are oval-shaped and grow to be about 2 inches (5 centimeters) in length and 1 inch (3 centimeters) in diameter.

    The testicles are also part of the endocrine system because they produce hormones, including testosterone (pronounced: tess-TOSS-tuh-rone). Testosterone is a major part of puberty in guys, and as a guy makes his way through puberty, his testicles produce more and more of it. Testosterone is the hormone that causes guys to develop deeper voices, bigger muscles, and body and facial hair, and it also stimulates the production of sperm.

    Alongside the testicles are the epididymis (pronounced: ep-uh-DID-uh-miss) and the vas deferens (pronounced: VAS DEF-uh-runz), which make up the duct system of the male reproductive organs. The vas deferens is a muscular tube that passes upward alongside the testicles and transports the sperm-containing fluid called semen (pronounced: SEE-mun). The epididymis is a set of coiled tubes (one for each testicle) that connects to the vas deferens.

    The epididymis and the testicles hang in a pouch-like structure outside the pelvis called the scrotum. This bag of skin helps to regulate the temperature of testicles, which need to be kept cooler than body temperature to produce sperm. The scrotum changes size to maintain the right temperature. When the body is cold, the scrotum shrinks and becomes tighter to hold in body heat. When it's warm, the scrotum becomes larger and more floppy to get rid of extra heat. This happens without a guy ever having to think about it. The brain and the nervous system give the scrotum the cue to change size.

    The accessory glands, including the seminal vesicles and the prostate gland, provide fluids that lubricate the duct system and nourish the sperm. The seminal vesicles are sac-like structures attached to the vas deferens to the side of the bladder. The prostate gland, which produces some of the parts of semen, surrounds the ejaculatory ducts at the base of the urethra (pronounced: yoo-REE-thruh), just below the bladder. The urethra is the channel that carries the semen to the outside of the body through the penis. The urethra is also part of the urinary system because it is also the channel through which urine passes as it leaves the bladder and exits the body.

    The penis is actually made up of two parts: the shaft and the glans. The shaft is the main part of the penis and the glans is the tip (sometimes called the head). At the end of the glans is a small slit or opening, which is where semen and urine exit the body through the urethra. The inside of the penis is made of a spongy tissue that can expand and contract.

    All boys are born with a foreskin, a fold of skin at the end of the penis covering the glans. Some boys have a circumcision, which means that a doctor or clergy member cuts away the foreskin. Circumcision is usually performed during a baby boy's first few days of life. Although circumcision is not medically necessary, parents who choose to have their children circumcised often do so based on religious beliefs, concerns about hygiene, or cultural or social reasons. Penises work the same, whether they are circumcised or not.



    What Is the Female Reproductive System?

    Most species have two sexes: male and female. Each sex has its own unique reproductive system. They are different in shape and structure, but both are specifically designed to produce, nourish, and transport either the egg or sperm.

    Unlike the male, the human female has a reproductive system located entirely in the pelvis (that's the lowest part of the abdomen). The external part of the female reproductive organs is called the vulva, which means covering. Located between the legs, the vulva covers the opening to the vagina and other reproductive organs located inside the body.

    The fleshy area located just above the top of the vaginal opening is called the mons pubis (pronounced: MONZ PYOO-bis). Two pairs of skin flaps called the labia (which means lips and is pronounced: LAY-bee-uh) surround the vaginal opening. The clitoris (pronounced: KLIH-tuh-rus), a small sensory organ, is located toward the front of the vulva where the folds of the labia join. Between the labia are openings to the urethra (the canal that carries urine from the bladder to the outside of the body, which is pronounced: yoo-REE-thruh) and vagina. Once girls become sexually mature, the outer labia and the mons pubis are covered by pubic hair.

    A female's internal reproductive organs are the vagina, uterus, fallopian tubes, and ovaries.

    The vagina is a muscular, hollow tube that extends from the vaginal opening to the uterus. The vagina is about 3 to 5 inches (8 to 12 centimeters) long in a grown woman. Because it has muscular walls it can expand and contract. This ability to become wider or narrower allows the vagina to accommodate something as slim as a tampon and as wide as a baby. The vagina's muscular walls are lined with mucous membranes, which keep it protected and moist. The vagina has several functions: for sexual intercourse, as the pathway that a baby takes out of a woman's body during childbirth, and as the route for the menstrual blood (the period) to leave the body from the uterus.

    A very thin piece of skin-like tissue called the hymen partly covers the opening of the vagina. Hymens are often different from person to person. Most women find their hymens have stretched or torn after their first sexual experience, and the hymen may bleed a little (this usually causes little, if any, pain). Some women who have had sex don't have much of a change in their hymens, though.

    The vagina connects with the uterus, or womb, at the cervix. The cervix has strong, thick walls. The opening of the cervix is very small (no wider than a straw), which is why a tampon can never get lost inside a girl's body. During childbirth, the cervix can expand to allow a baby to pass.

    The uterus is shaped like an upside-down pear, with a thick lining and muscular walls — in fact, the uterus contains some of the strongest muscles in the female body. These muscles are able to expand and contract to accommodate a growing fetus and then help push the baby out during labor. When a woman isn't pregnant, the uterus is only about 3 inches (7.5 centimeters) long and 2 inches (5 centimeters) wide.

    At the upper corners of the uterus, the fallopian (pronounced: fuh-LO-pee-un) tubes connect the uterus to the ovaries (pronounced: OH-vuh-reez). The ovaries are two oval-shaped organs that lie to the upper right and left of the uterus. They produce, store, and release eggs into the fallopian tubes in the process called ovulation (pronounced: av-yoo-LAY-shun). Each ovary measures about 1½ to 2 inches (4 to 5 centimeters) in a grown woman.

    There are two fallopian tubes, each attached to a side of the uterus. The fallopian tubes are about 4 inches (10 centimeters) long and about as wide as a piece of spaghetti. Within each tube is a tiny passageway no wider than a sewing needle. At the other end of each fallopian tube is a fringed area that looks like a funnel. This fringed area wraps around the ovary but doesn't completely attach to it. When an egg pops out of an ovary, it enters the fallopian tube. Once the egg is in the fallopian tube, tiny hairs in the tube's lining help push it down the narrow passageway toward the uterus.

    The ovaries are also part of the endocrine system because they produce female sex hormones such as estrogen (pronounced: ESS-truh-jun) and progesterone (pronounced: pro-JESS-tuh-rone).
     
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  2. aditya8485

    aditya8485 Member

    As far as i know the male reproductive system consists of testes,penis and the sperms which are present in the sperm tank located in the testes. The testes is a very delicate and sensitive organ in the male body and is extremely painful when injured. The sperms play the primary role in the reproduction of a baby in the uterus of the female.
     
  3. Pepple

    Pepple New Member

    The reproductive system is a compilation of internal and external organs in both male and female functioning together for the goal of procreating. It plays a vital role in the survival of the species.
     
  4. Teachergeorge

    Teachergeorge Member

    The reproductive system is the one which defines our gender; being a male or a female with exception of a transgender. The organs between the legs are responsible for the growth and development of a new offspring.
     

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