What kind of power do you want to achieve?

Discussion in 'Nonfiction Writing' started by nekochan30, Jun 10, 2018.

  1. nekochan30

    nekochan30 Member

    When you were a kid we love super heroes and we want to be like them and you want to have a super power like Superman, Spider Man and so many fiction characters that we watch and admire.So what kind of super power you want to achieve when you given a one wish to have a power?For me I want to have power of levitation I want to fly go high and go to any place I want you will feel that you are free, free of everything free at all problems and then also add the power of teleportation much easier to transport at any place that you want. And so you what kind of power do you want and why?
     
  2. missjetaime94

    missjetaime94 New Member

    Well, ever since I was a kid, I want to have the ability to fly just like superman. Isn't it cool to be able fly? Who doesn't love that? right? And aside from flying I also want to be able to hide from anyone, so I like to have the invisibility power. So that if I'm not in the mood or don't want to see someone I can just snap my fingers and then became invisible.
     
  3. gentlevelvet

    gentlevelvet New Member

    I want the power of Instant Teleportation.

    I want to be able to travel anywhere in the world, any time I want, instantaneously. I don't need invisibility or the ability to read minds or the ability to fly if I had Instant Teleportation.

    Think about it: If I could instantly travel anywhere I want, I wouldn't need to fly. I can hide in a closet instantly, so I wouldn't need invisibility. And, while I'm hiding in the closet, I can hear people talking to themselves or to others. Voila! A total of four powers in one.
     
  4. bluwish01

    bluwish01 New Member

    There are a lot of powers that is very beneficial to us, but I wanted to have the all-knowing power, I want to be omniscient. Knowledge is power, the more knowledge you have the more respect you can gain and eventually power. With knowledge, you don't need to put extensive work on your body, you can just choose the right way to accomplish your goals. Helping people will become easy like never been before because you already have the right, accurate and absolute answers and ways on how to solve their problems. If you know everything, you can become a great leader. You can make a very prosperous and wealthy kingdom or country. You will no longer be having the problem with money anymore. Omniscient means all-knowing, Having this power only means I can be prepared every time and the fear of the unknown will be no longer affected me. I will use this power to earn money and eventually to put up a business. I will do this again and again my name will be known to the world. When the time comes to the world recognizes me, I will step up and become a leader. I will use this power to make my land prosperous, strong, and wealthy. A land where love, peace, friendship, and unity exist.
     
  5. Elena2018

    Elena2018 New Member

    I would like to have a power of a healer. If you and people that are close to you, nothing else matters. When you are sick and even money can't help you, this is the worst thing in the world. I would like to help people who suffer because they are sick. I think this power is a the most important or all. I don't want to say that I want to be like Jesus but something similar.
     
  6. veeraveera

    veeraveera New Member

    I would like to have the super power to read minds. That would help me to understand people and how they think. It would not be only practical for my own life, but that kind of information could potentially change the world.

    What do you guys think, if someone had a super power like reading minds or being invisible, should they use that for helping others like super heroes? Would they have moral responsibility to do so?
     
  7. mchichi

    mchichi New Member

    i want a power not to get old or get sick ever immortality with limitless vitality because i dont want to undergo the pain the anxiety during the times i got sick to major extent..i just want to experience a life where i will not be sick ever and will not grow old..however only GOd knows what should be for us so i wont question HIm ever..the LORd knows whats best for me so thy will be done..
     
  8. amiah2jade

    amiah2jade New Member

    I want to achieve the ultimate power. To be comfortable being me and to be able to pass that on to everyone I meet. It isn't just about the physical me either, it's about the mental me and the, financially stable me. It's also about being okay with the decisions I make and being able to hold my head up no matter what.
     
  9. simply_juli3

    simply_juli3 New Member

    I want the power that has to do with controlling the four elements just like the anime Avatar. It's just so cool to make things move around you. I think that can help people too especially those victims of calamity. Controlling the movement of the storm or earthquakes and other natural disasters that can happen in our surroundings. But of course, only God can do that.
     
  10. ewapc101

    ewapc101 Member

    • Creative nonfiction merges the boundaries between literary art (fiction, poetry) and research nonfiction (statistical, fact-filled, run of the mill journalism). It is writing composed of the real, or of facts, that employs the same literary devices as fiction such as setting, voice/tone, character development, etc. This makes if different (more “creative”) than standard nonfiction writing.
    • Sometimes called literary journalism or the literature of fact, creative nonfiction merges the boundaries between literary art (fiction, poetry) and research nonfiction (statistical, fact-filled, run of the mill journalism). It is writing composed of the real, or of facts, that employs the same literary devices as fiction, such as setting, voice/tone, character development, etc.
    • Creative nonfiction should (1) include accurate and well-researched information, (2) hold the interest of the reader, and (3) potentially blur the realms of fact and fiction in a pleasing, literary style (while remaining grounded in fact).
    • In the end, creative nonfiction can be as experimental as fiction—it just needs to be based in the real.
     
  11. ewapc101

    ewapc101 Member

    • It's important to clarify that the content of creative nonfiction does not necessarily have to come from the life or the experience of the writer. Say, for instance, the writer is using techniques from literary journalism to create a portrait of a person interviewed. The writer may choose to write a portrait of the interviewee through an omniscient perspective, meaning the writer wouldn't be in the piece at all.
    • On the other hand, nonfiction writers often choose to write about topics or people close to them (including themselves). As long as the piece deals with something real, or something based on the real, the writer is allowed to take the piece in any direction he or she wishes.
    • In creative nonfiction, writers attempt to observe, record, and thus shape a moment(s) from real life. Writers thus extract meaning through factual details—they combine the fact of detail with the literary extrapolation necessary in rendering meaning from an observed scene.
    • At the same time, successful creative nonfiction attempts to overlay fact with traditional conceptions of dramatic structure. While rendering meaning from an observed scene, a piece should suggest a beginning, middle and end that clearly conveys the conflict and the characters, and pushes the action toward some sort of closure.
    • In effect, creative nonfiction attempts to project a dramatic, literary framework upon everyday existence, rendering it enjoyable, enlightening and potentially meaningful.
    • While writing creative nonfiction, writers should dwell on sensory details and "show show show."
    • A piece should never just tell the reader something or summarize—this is what research non-fiction does.
     
  12. ewapc101

    ewapc101 Member

    • The Personal Essay:
      A piece of writing, usually in the first person, that focuses on a topic through the lens of the personal experience of the narrator. It can be narrative or non-narrative-it can tell a story in a traditional way or improvise a new way for doing so. Ultimately, it should always be based on true, personal experience.
    • The Memoir:
      A memoir is a longer piece of creative nonfiction that delves deep into a writer's personal experience. It typically uses multiple scenes/stories as a way of examining a writer's life (or an important moment in a writer's life). It is usually, but not necessarily, narrative.
    • The Short Short: A short/short is a (typically) narrative work that is concise and to the point. It uses imagery and details to relay the meaning, or the main idea of the piece. Typically it's only one or two scenes, and is like a flash of a moment that tells a whole story.
    • Literary Journalism:
      Literary journalism uses the techniques of journalism (such as interviews and reviews) in order to look outside of the straight forward, objective world that journalism creates. It uses literary practices to capture the scene/setting of the assignment or the persona of the person being interviewed. It can often be narrative or heavily imagistic. Another important aspect of literary journalism is that it often stretches the idea of "objective facts" in order to better reflect real life and real people. In other words, while journalism is about being completely objective, literary journalism says that people can't be objective because they already have their own subjective views about the world. Therefore, by taking the "objectiveness" out of the journalistic process, the writer is being more truthful.
    • The Lyric Essay:
      The lyric essay is similar to the personal essay in that it also deals with a topic that affects the reader. However, the lyric essay relies heavily on descriptions and imagery. Lyrical suggests something poetic, musical, or flowing (in a sense). This type of piece uses a heavily descriptive, flowing tone in order to tell a story.
     
  13. ewapc101

    ewapc101 Member

    Memoirs are an often overlooked subdivision of creative writing, and more specifically, creative non-fiction. They have the potential to be incredibly interesting, richly developed, beautifully moving pieces that can sometimes be confused with autobiography. Generally, autobiographies are the life story or history of a person's life written by that person. Though memoirs share some similarities with autobiographies, such as first person narration, they are more than a recounting of one's life events in chronological order. Instead, they can be descriptions of one single event or moment in one's life, rather than that life in its entirety, and tend to be written in a less structured or formal manner. Memoirs have the capacity to be funny, profound, moving, cynical, etc., and may even have resemblances to fiction in their creativity. Memoirs can focus on one specific event, place, person, etc. or they can be expanded to encompass a broader range of events, snapshots, or memories in the author's experience.
     
  14. ewapc101

    ewapc101 Member

    • Focus. In some ways, the personal essay is similar to memoir and many of the same techniques can be used effectively. It differs in that an essay is focused on one specific topic(and here, it will be explored through your own experiences) whereas the memoir has the capability to trace or illuminate several themes, topics, and ideas via the author’s life (or part(s) of that life) that he/she describes (and how he/she describes it).
    • Organization. Not to be confused with form (see below). Your essay, like other essays, should have some kind of coherent organization to it. This is not to say that you must use thesis style (in fact, we are confident that powerful personal essays follow that organization scheme less than 5% of the time). No matter how you choose to organize (and what form you use), be sure that your paragraphs and ideas flow from one to the next, connected by a common theme (trying to tackle the topic on which you are writing). It can be scattered or fragmented (if that is a stylistic/form choice you make), but the entire paper should have a relationship, even if it only becomes clear at the end. This allows the reader to follow your experience.
    • Form. One of the best parts of this kind of writing is the power given to you as the writer. There is no form, no formula, no tried and true method that you must use to be effective. In fact, to copy something that somebody else has done is not only rather boring, but also defeats the purpose of this being a personal essay. Choose a form and style that suits you and is fitting for the experience that you are describing. Try to think of the form as a part of the writing itself, not just a framework for it: the form should actually enhance and make more poignant what it is you are taking about. Push the boundaries, but don’t go too far—you are still writing an essay (and be sure that you follow any specific requirements outlined by your professor).
    • Diction/Language. Like form, in the personal essay (and creative writing generally, perhaps even, to some extent, writing in general) the way in which you say something can “mean” just as much as the form into which you place what it is you are saying. Use language to enhance what you are writing about and not just as a means to say it. Here is where you can get really creative and appropriately use linguistic “play” to explore your topic and your own relation to it in new and complex ways.
     
  15. ewapc101

    ewapc101 Member

    • Feeling: this would be your emotional response to things, what images are evoked when you think about a particular topic or image based on the feelings you get from it.
    • Thinking: this would be your introspective look at whatever topic you have, from a philosophical or logical perspective.
    • Observational: this is truly the most objective channel, where you write about something purely in a physical sense.
      A five to ten minute 'free write' in one of these channels about an idea or something physical can both be good ways to figure out what to write about. For example, writing about a house through the feeling channel will produce something very different from the observational channel. A lot of material can come through free writing; it can spark an idea for a more focused piece.
     
  16. ewapc101

    ewapc101 Member

    • Creative writing pieces become more focused and therefore stronger when the author learns to think of the piece as building toward a specific moment in time, as building toward a specific effect or image that the author wants to leave a reader with.
    • One very short example of a piece that builds toward a moment is below (as seen in the anthology New Sudden Fiction.
     
  17. ewapc101

    ewapc101 Member

    • "It's a funny thing—that which can cause inanimate objects to take on great meaning. I remember my friend Oliver, with his glasses and his quiet way-the way he'd do everything slowly, the way that there was no rush----excepting of course those moments of spontaneity and levity that seemed to randomly burst from him like juice from one of those gusher fruit snacks from the old days. How is it that a chess board can be such a slice of life? It's plastic and felt that's packaged in Korea by workers getting paid God-doesn't-even-want-to-know how little. And yet in my hands, in my mind, those pieces come alive. It's a delirious transformation, how sixty four checkered squares become relevant. The heads in the hands (which greases up the hair), and that wild look that the players can get-the savagery, the ire, the devil himself looking out from behind the eyes of someone that wouldn't say a goddamn word to you if you cut in front of him at the Starbucks line. The board changes people."
     
  18. ewapc101

    ewapc101 Member

    • There are many images in this free write: it rambles about the author's experiences at chess tournaments and wanders down various tangents; however, eventually the author finds a theme that he likes and sees has potential to use throughout the piece.
    • Even though at this point in the writing it may not be clear to the author what his/her moment is, the point of the free write is to find a starting point that the author knows will lead to some sort of moment, even if the author doesn't know what exactly that moment will be.
    • In the above free write, when the author got to "The board changes people," he subjectively saw this as a strong statement to use to start his piece because of the potential for interesting ultimate effects it offered—he could use interesting images to show how his opening statement is true, or he could focus the piece toward an ending line in which he contradicts the opening statement. Even if you do not know what your moment will be right away, if you find yourself thinking and talking about ultimate effect then you are on the right track.
    • If you have a piece that doesn't seem to be building toward anything, sometimes it's useful to just chat about the piece. Chatting is easier than free writing for many individuals; having someone to bounce ideas off of can provide you with a creative spark.
    • If you have a piece that is building toward something but it still seems awkward to you, that is probably because the piece is not taut--that is, not all of what is written contributes to the moment. In this case, ask yourself how different aspects of the piece contribute to the meaning and work from there.
     
  19. ewapc101

    ewapc101 Member

    • Precise language is the difference between an engaging story or poem and a boring story or poem. Look for vague language and abstractions (some abstractions include hard-to-grasp concepts like intelligence, criticism, love, and anger which can often be more effectively shown through specific events, actions, or dialogue in a piece).
    • Though sometimes you may be using this language for some other purpose (like in dialogue to capture the voice of a character), generally speaking the more specific the language is the stronger the piece will be.
    • Janet Burroway's book The Elements of Craft has a terrific discussion of significant, concrete detail which conveys this point well: "The notion of detail is important to the image because it moves away from the generalized notion and toward the particular. For example, creature is a generalized notion, hard to see except in the vaguest way. Animal is still vague…four-legged animal is a little more specific; domestic animal a little more; dog narrows the field; mix-breed Sheppard we can see, old Sammy asleep on the red rug, his haunches twitching in his dreams brings the dog into sharp focus in our minds."
    • The best way to play with language is to find places where your language is vague. Sometimes, you will have a specific purpose in choosing the language that you did; more often, it might be the case that you go through your piece to find places where the language could be more precise.
     
  20. ewapc101

    ewapc101 Member

    • Creative nonfiction merges the boundaries between literary art (fiction, poetry) and research nonfiction (statistical, fact-filled, run of the mill journalism). It is writing composed of the real, or of facts, that employs the same literary devices as fiction such as setting, voice/tone, character development, etc. This makes if different (more “creative”) than standard nonfiction writing.
    • Sometimes called literary journalism or the literature of fact, creative nonfiction merges the boundaries between literary art (fiction, poetry) and research nonfiction (statistical, fact-filled, run of the mill journalism). It is writing composed of the real, or of facts, that employs the same literary devices as fiction, such as setting, voice/tone, character development, etc.
    • Creative nonfiction should (1) include accurate and well-researched information, (2) hold the interest of the reader, and (3) potentially blur the realms of fact and fiction in a pleasing, literary style (while remaining grounded in fact).
    • In the end, creative nonfiction can be as experimental as fiction—it just needs to be based in the real.
     
  21. ewapc101

    ewapc101 Member

    • It's important to clarify that the content of creative nonfiction does not necessarily have to come from the life or the experience of the writer. Say, for instance, the writer is using techniques from literary journalism to create a portrait of a person interviewed. The writer may choose to write a portrait of the interviewee through an omniscient perspective, meaning the writer wouldn't be in the piece at all.
    • On the other hand, nonfiction writers often choose to write about topics or people close to them (including themselves). As long as the piece deals with something real, or something based on the real, the writer is allowed to take the piece in any direction he or she wishes.
    • In creative nonfiction, writers attempt to observe, record, and thus shape a moment(s) from real life. Writers thus extract meaning through factual details—they combine the fact of detail with the literary extrapolation necessary in rendering meaning from an observed scene.
    • At the same time, successful creative nonfiction attempts to overlay fact with traditional conceptions of dramatic structure. While rendering meaning from an observed scene, a piece should suggest a beginning, middle and end that clearly conveys the conflict and the characters, and pushes the action toward some sort of closure.
    • In effect, creative nonfiction attempts to project a dramatic, literary framework upon everyday existence, rendering it enjoyable, enlightening and potentially meaningful.
    • While writing creative nonfiction, writers should dwell on sensory details and "show show show."
    • A piece should never just tell the reader something or summarize—this is what research non-fiction does.
     
  22. ewapc101

    ewapc101 Member

    Sophisticated prose, vivid description, an understanding of structure and how drama works. When I see that in what students are doing, I'm always impressed.
     
  23. ewapc101

    ewapc101 Member

    I would say specificity in all kinds of modes, whether that's in reflection, in anchoring the argument in better examples, in going back through narrative or descriptive parts of writing and really rendering the world in a much clearer fashion. You know, I think the words "specificity" and "precision" apply to persuasive papers, to academic writing, to creative prose. I think the opposite of that is being vague or overly general in your thinking, in your attempt to render a scene or a character.
     
  24. ewapc101

    ewapc101 Member

    I think that it's good for students to do some pre-writing: to clarify what they think they are going to try to do in their paper before they actually write the paper, to write a summary in one paragraph of their basic argument that's going be in a 10-page paper. Or even with stories - I think you should write a simple 150-word or 200-word paragraph that states in summary the basic makeup of what your story will become. I think students sometimes will sit down and start writing and they get to page five and go, "You know, I don't know what the end is supposed to be." I think that writing a summary paragraph first can really help
     

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